As you assemble or reassemble your team, avoid a common mistake – not clarifying the expectations of the job from the start. Founders tell me, “The job requirements are in the job description,” or “I told them what I expect of them every month.”  And sadly, just “sharing the vision” does not provide enough clarity for many new employees.

Take Dean for example, a very talented artist-technician and web designer who did beautiful work. Anthony, the founder of an athletic wear startup, discovered after several weeks that Dean consistently put off work on major projects and was late for meetings. The morale of other team members started to dip as a function of Dean’s influence. After six months of conflict, confusion and miscommunication Dean was let go.

Looking back, Anthony realized that his frequent reminders and expressions of disappointment were efforts to manage Dean versus managing the expectations he had for Dean. At that point, Anthony took a major leap as a leader and a manager. He created a document for new employees that clearly states the job expectations with metrics, deadlines and the consequences for not meeting those expectations. Anthony verbally outlines the expectations and requires the employee to sign the document declaring their understanding and acceptance of the expectations.

Fortunately, this action has made up for the lost time and money by hiring more reliable and team-oriented employees. This experience also taught Anthony a valuable lesson about management – make clear the expectations and the right people will manage themselves.

Even with the best intentions, some employees need help in managing themselves. CoreCoaching can help them get things done, done well and on time. Contact me at [email protected]  

 

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